Theories On The Causes And Treatments For Cold Knees and Cold Feet

Theories On The Causes And Treatments For Cold Knees and Cold Feet

Cold KneesNote: This post does not deal with the endeavor of height increase, but is related. I have stated multiple times before that I planned to expand the scope of the research of this website to include bone and cartilage related medical conditions. Height Increase research is for cosmetic reasons, but real medical problems like osteoporosis and osteo-arthritis should always be dealt with first. 

Recently my Asian girlfriend started to notice that her feet and knees was getting unusually cold even though the temperature is quite warm in this Summer weather. She has had a history of dealing with cold knees and cold feet, as well as cold hands.

However, this recent episode has made me start to suggest that there might be some deeper connections and physiological causes to her condition which even most medical professionals have never been able to decipher. Having lived in Asia and seen the bone physiology of the East Asian ethnic groups, and done meta-statistical analysis to compare various racial groups, I feel that I might be able to give a completely new and rather original spin on this rather common and annoying little symptom.

Here is what I do know.

  • East Asian females on average, in general seems to have a lower than average bone mineral density (BMD) than other races.
  • It has been contributed to the fact that while still an embryo, the developing child did not get the high enough level of calcium needed for the prenatal baby to grow. (refer to Bone Health in Chinese American Women). it seems that based on the diet of East Asian cultures, the females of those cultures just wasn’t getting enough calcium (maybe high level of Lactose Intolerance??) , which translated to their developing baby, which grew up with low levels of bone density as well.
  • Not only that, since pregnancy means that a high level of calcium will be transferred from the mother’s body to the babies, the mother will have an increase chance of osteoporosis.
  • Anecdotally, my mother who has multiple Asian female friends have recently told me that they were getting knee replacements as early as their 50s. Knee replacements is one brutal surgery, where a prosthetic is placed where there used to be cartilage and bone before.

So what does this all have to do with cold knees and cold feet?

Based on my research of the past 2 years, cold knees and cold feet, which seems to predominantly effect East Asian females and Caucasian females, is the result of the individual who has a low level of bone mineral density, which has a ripple effect on the other types of tissue connected to the osteo tissue (aka bones).

The cold knees is a sign that they have weaker than average bones and joints. However, what do we mean when we use the word “weaker”?

I know from personal experiences that my girlfriend has never been able to donate blood because the blood donating centers say that she has a very low level of Iron in her blood, which has led to her having anemia. The result is that she has had to go see her personal gynecologist to get ferrous fulmarate intravenously dripped inside her on a regular basis.

In addition, she has a horrible habit of drinking very low levels of water consumption. Her incentive in changing her water consumption level has resulted in the cold knee symptoms disappearing for a long duration, until recently when she moved and changed her eating habits.

It was also found that she has a slight thyroid issue when I took her for a full medical exam more than a year ago. In addition, her menstrual cycle is much larger than average, resulting in more blood loss, which might also contribute to the low level of iron in her blood.

So here is what I am willing to outline for the medical condition of Cold Knees and Cold Feet…

Symptoms…

  • Cold Knees
  • Cold Feet – Sometimes Cold Hands is another symptom

Causes…

Note: All the following causes are theories and guesses based on my personal experience and research.

  • Lack of Iron – the person might be anemic
  • Hypothyroidism – the symptoms of hypothyroidism include 1) increased sensitivity to cold temperature, heavier or irregular menstrual periods, joint pain, and depression. (source)
  • If not hypothyroidism, then some type of thyroid issue (don’t quote me on that one)
  • Habitual Low Consumption of Water 
  • Low Bone Mineral Density – This suggest that the person has a much higher chance of getting osteoporosis later in life.
  • Decreased Circulation 

Update 8/13/2014: It seems there there might be 2 other medical conditions which might be linked to cold knees. They are 1) celiac disease/gluten sensitivity and 2) unusual period types, specifically heavy thick bleeding periods, which I suspect is causing the onset of the cold feet and knees.

Treatments…

Note: Everything I will recommend will be based on personal, amateur level research.

  • First, go to one’s GP (Primary/Family Doctor) to get a full blood work done to see if they are low on any vitamins or minerals. – Check for hypothyroidism and anemia.
  • Start Taking a MultiVitamin – I Suggest a Centrum Silver For Women at the local GNC or Walgreens
  • Take Vitamin D3
  • Take Iron Supplement – this is based on my experiences with a gf with anemic symptoms.
  • Take Vitamin K2 – This is critical. I can not stress how important MK-2 and MK-7 are.
  • Get the recommended daily level of Magnesium – (source: Magnesium Is Crucial for Bones). Magnesium is critical for Vitamin D to work properly.
  • Drink at least 2 liters of water each day – stay hydrated. This will improve on the circulation problem and help with the thyroid issue a little
  • If the person recently went through pregnancy ie a woman, add Calcium to one’s diet to replace for the loss of calcium which got transferred to the baby.
  • Get deep tissue massages ie Swedish – for increased circulation
  • Yoga – for increased circulation

Low Term Considerations.

Here is what my research has told me after many older females I’ve known in my life who had to go through full knee surgery has suggested to me.

If you are in your 20s or 30s and experience cold knees or cold feet (and hands) it is a sign that the bones (and thus also the cartilage) in your body is getting weak.

The way that humans anatomically work, being bipedal, and walk upright, means that structurally speaking, the knees are the weakest area on the human body. Knees and the lower back are the two most common locations to result in pain and problems with people, whether they have an active life or not. (Have anyone else noticed just how many chiropractors practices and offices have been popping up in American towns, even though the theory behind chiropractor work is based on Subluxation, which has no scientific basis? Based on my guesses, chiropractors is nothing more than modern bone setting (which was called Manipulation Surgery at the turn of the 20th century) combined with deep tissue massage physical therapy. The theory of chiropractors is just pseudoscience. From one source (available here) it is said that  “Back pain is the leading cause of disability in Americans under 45 years old. More than 26 million Americans between the ages of 20-64 experience frequent back pain”.  )

Cold knees and cold feet is a sign that the person is at a much higher level of risk for osteoporosis (aka low bone mineral density) and osteo-arthritis (aka degradation of articular cartilage structure) later in life, as quickly as even 10-15 years into the future. 

They will be the ones getting the total knee replacements and they don’t even realize yet in the future. No regular/family doctor with their limited experience and knowledge on the physiology of the bones and cartilage would be able to explain what is going on.

Physiologically speaking, it is caused by three main things…

  1. Decreased circulation in that area
  2. A specific mineral is being transported out of the region (currently, I am not sure which one). (Note: From a physics point of view, it would not make any sense how it is possible that within the human body, a certain local area is cooler than the surrounding area on a Summer Day (I measured the temperature on the skin using a Thermocouple) unless there is a biological process acting similar to an air conditioner going on i.e. a heat transfer and/or a type of chemical endothermic reaction.)
  3. Some form of hormonal imbalance is triggered at some level in the pathway upstream.

This post is for my fiance/future wife, and all of the rest of the people in the world who experience this condition and don’t know what it means. I’ve consulted internal medicine and orthopedic specialists and they have never been able to provide for me a decent and solid sounding answer to the causes and potential treatments to this condition, which I believe is a symptom and sign that something much worst is going to happen later in life.

3 thoughts on “Theories On The Causes And Treatments For Cold Knees and Cold Feet

  1. Aragon

    This website have been unstable lately. Sometimes the more recent posts dissapear and the site looks just like the before the last update.

    Reply
  2. norma haynes

    I am 84 and have had both knees replaced. I am suffereing from very cold knees and feet. It is hot here now but my knees do not know it. It is terrible and painful. Norma Haynes

    Reply
  3. Paul

    This is an extremely insightful article. I’m a male 28, turning 29 very soon and have been experiencing uncomfortable pains in both my knees in recent months. The winter months, the cool winds have certainly exaggerated the pains, but it still does not account for the cold knees and feet sensations I feel even in 70-80 degree weather. Being half Hispanic, half Japanese, and having lived a heavily active lifestyle playing tennis, basketball, lacrosse, and doing lots of leg work over the past 25 years, ever since being on my feet, this article feels right on point with my problems. The cold always penetrates my knees, feet, and hands first. I can still be active, get my body moving and the adrenaline pumping, but it doesn’t seem worth it anymore. Being half East-Asian, I must admit I can see the differences in bone structure/density to other races. Overall I’m 5’10” 170-180 lbs, I look strong but, the problem areas have always stood out, even was diagnosed with Osgood- Schlatter when I was 12, and have had relatively inflexible knees. I mean it is what it is, others might cope with pain better, but I certainly can relate to your insightful article.

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *