Can You Increase Height And Grow Taller Using Ayurvedic Urea?

Me: This is one of the most craziest of ideas for potentially increasing ones height and even though I am open to all ideas from east and western science and medicine, this idea is a little extreme for me to accept. As we all know Urea is the main component of human Urine. From my studies on ayurvedic medicine years ago, I know that the consumption of the human or cow urine has been practiced quite extensively in certain cultures, but specifically the Indian culture.

Analysis: While the main link of Urea is to the human urine, urea is also leaked out of the human body through the pores from sweating. If the Indian medicine therapy of Ayurveda through urea is believe to increase height, then we must find some evidence in the medical literature to see what are it’s effects when injected or taken orally. It is stated, “Urea is synthesized in the body of many organisms as part of the urea cycle, either from the oxidation of amino acids or from ammonia. In this cycle, amino groups donated by ammonia and L-aspartate are converted to urea, while L-ornithine, citrulline, L-argininosuccinate, and L-arginine act as intermediates. Urea production occurs in the liver and is regulated by N-acetylglutamate. Urea is found dissolved in blood (in the reference range of 2.5 to 6.7 mmol/liter) and is excreted by the kidney as a component of urine. In addition, a small amount of urea is excreted (along with sodium chloride and water) in sweat.” Urea itself has no color, no smell, is solid and is really just a nitrogen derived compound. Urea converts to amino acids and amino acids convert to Urea. The Urea molecule can convert to carbon dioxide and ammonia molecules and is use extensively in fertilizers. If human ingested it in high amounts, it will actually break apart the covalent bonds in proteins. At this point, I would say that the idea of trying urea to grow taller has no validity. On the grow taller website, the people say that Ayurvedic Urea costs up to $10,000 for the real Urea. How am I supposed to know this expensive chemical compound was not the product of human urine waste or chemical plant waste?

From this article I found from googling “drink urine” into google from the website The Independent HERE…the people claim that drinking one’s urine can cure the cold and cancer. Other highlights are…

  • Advocates claim it has antibacterial, antifungal, antiviral and anticancer properties.
  • Research in the 1990s claimed that drinking urine could cure jet lag.
  • It is highly sterile. The Aztecs used it to prevent wounds becoming infected.

There is some science to the practice called Auto-urine therapy or Urotherapy. The technical general term is Urophagia (wiki article).

From the Grow Taller Pyramid Secret website HERE


Ayurvedic Urea to Grow Taller

October 27, 2012 in How To Grow Taller

I have received hundreds of emails about people asking me about Ayurvedic Urea. Apparently, Ayurvedic Urea is a product that promises people to grow taller without doing anything. I have tried researching about it, and I am going to reveal some information about this product to you! Whether or not it really works, you guys decide for yourself! It is soon going to be launched in 2014!

What is Ayurvedic Urea?

Ayurvedic Urea is a powder form product that when consumed, is proven to help one grow taller significantly! Depending on how much one wants to grow taller, the duration and dosage will apply.

Does it guarantee growth?

Apparently, many online forums and past clients have told me that they really grew taller from Ayurvedic Urea, and that they really became a lot taller!

How much does it cost?

It costs a bomb! It can range from US$10,000- US$100,000 depending on where you can get it, how much you are planning to grow, and whom you purchase it from!

Who can use Ayurvedic Urea to grow taller?

People from ages 13-35 who wants to grow taller can try taking Ayurvedic Urea! It is not advised for people above 50 years old, and people with HIV or dwarfism to take it as there will be no effect on them!

Where can I find Ayurvedic Urea?

You can Ayurvedic Urea in remote parts of Nepal and Africa!

How long must I wait to see results?

Result is said to be visible within 1-2 weeks of usage! A person can generally grow 1 inch in 10-14 days!

What are some negative effects of Ayurvedic Urea?

There are no found negative effects or long term disadvantages to it! However, people who consume Ayruvedic Urea may experience extreme fatigue and is advised to sleep and rest more! Therefore, try to reduce your activity level to the minimum if you are consuming this!

Where can I order it?

You can order it online! However choose the right supplier as you might get scammed easily!

Why is it so expensive?

Ayurvedic Urea is very rare. The government in Nepal and Africa is regulating the sale of it, and only a certain amount of it can be sold every year! Therefore you have to grab fast!

How do you use it?

Basically, you will have to consume about 0.5kg-1kg of Ayurvedic Urea a day (morning, afternoon, night) , depending on the dosage. Instructions will be given when you purchase them! Also, avoid drinking and smoking when you are on Ayurvedic Urea!
In conclusion, those of you who want to purchase this item must think critically, and be ready to fork out a huge sum of money! It can be said that this product costs more than the traditional limb lengthening surgery! Do not purchase immediately before researching and doing the necessary measures to protect yourself from scammers.

With that, we wish all of you the best of luck in your growing taller journey!

From the Wikipedia article on Urea for Medicinal Use

Urea or carbamide is an organic compound with the chemical formula CO(NH2)2. The molecule has two —NH2 groups joined by a carbonyl (C=O) functional group.

Urea serves an important role in the metabolism of nitrogen-containing compounds by animals and is the main nitrogen-containing substance in the urine of mammals. It is a colorless, odorless solid, although the ammonia that it gives off in the presence of water, including water vapor in the air, has a strong odor. It is highly soluble in water and practically non-toxic (LD50 is 15 g/kg for rat). Dissolved in water, it is neither acidic nor alkaline. The body uses it in many processes, the most notable one being nitrogen excretion. Urea is widely used in fertilizers as a convenient source of nitrogen. Urea is also an important raw material for the chemical industry. The synthesis of this organic compound by Friedrich Wöhler in 1828 from an inorganic precursor was an important milestone in the development of organic chemistry, as it showed for the first time that a molecule found in living organisms could be synthesized in the lab without biological starting materials (thus contradicting a theory widely prevalent at one time, called vitalism).

The terms urea and carbamide are also used for a class of chemical compounds sharing the same functional group RR’N—CO—NRR’, namely a carbonyl group attached to two organic amine residues. Examples include carbamide peroxide, allantoin, and hydantoin. Ureas are closely related to biurets and related in structure to amides, carbamates, carbodiimides, and thiocarbamides.Related chemicals

History

Urea was first discovered in urine in 1727 by the Dutch scientist Herman Boerhaave, though this discovery is often attributed to the French chemist Hilaire Rouelle.[3] In 1828, the German chemist Friedrich Wöhler obtained urea by treating silver isocyanate with ammonium chloride.[4][5][6]

AgNCO + NH4Cl → (NH2)2CO + AgCl

This was the first time an organic compound was artificially synthesized from inorganic starting materials, without the involvement of living organisms. The results of this experiment implicitly discredited vitalism: the theory that the chemicals of living organisms are fundamentally different from inanimate matter. This insight was important for the development of organic chemistry. His discovery prompted Wöhler to write triumphantly to Berzelius: “I must tell you that I can make urea without the use of kidneys, either man or dog. Ammonium cyanate is urea.” For this discovery, Wöhler is considered by many[who?] the father of organic chemistry.

Physiology

Urea is synthesized in the body of many organisms as part of the urea cycle, either from the oxidation of amino acids or from ammonia. In this cycle, amino groups donated by ammonia and L-aspartate are converted to urea, while L-ornithine, citrulline, L-argininosuccinate, and L-arginine act as intermediates. Urea production occurs in the liver and is regulated by N-acetylglutamate. Urea is found dissolved in blood (in the reference range of 2.5 to 6.7 mmol/liter) and is excreted by the kidney as a component of urine. In addition, a small amount of urea is excreted (along with sodium chloride and water) in sweat.

Amino acids from ingested food that are not used for the synthesis of proteins and other biological substances are oxidized by the body, yielding urea and carbon dioxide, as an alternative source of energy.[7] The oxidation pathway starts with the removal of the amino group by a transaminase, the amino group is then fed into the urea cycle.

Ammonia (NH3) is another common byproduct of the metabolism of nitrogenous compounds. Ammonia is smaller, more volatile and more mobile than urea. If allowed to accumulate, ammonia would raise the pH in cells to toxic levels. Therefore many organisms convert ammonia to urea, even though this synthesis has a net energy cost. Being practically neutral and highly soluble in water, urea is a safe vehicle for the body to transport and excrete excess nitrogen.

In water, the amine groups undergo slow displacement by water molecules, producing ammonia and carbonate anion. For this reason, old, stale urine has a stronger odor than fresh urine.

In humans

The handling of urea by the kidneys is a vital part of human metabolism. Besides its role as carrier of waste nitrogen, urea also plays a role in the countercurrent exchange system of the nephrons, that allows for re-absorption of water and critical ions from the excreted urine. Urea is reabsorbed in the inner medullary collecting ducts of the nephrons,[8] thus raising the osmolarity in the medullary interstitiumsurrounding the thin ascending limb of the loop of Henle, which in turn causes water to be reabsorbed. By action of the urea transporter 2, some of this reabsorbed urea will eventually flow back into the thin ascending limb of the tubule, through the collecting ducts, and into the excreted urine.

This mechanism, which is controlled by the antidiuretic hormone, allows the body to create hyperosmotic urine, that has a higher concentration of dissolved substances than the blood plasma. This mechanism is important to prevent the loss of water, to maintain blood pressure, and to maintain a suitable concentration ofsodium ions in the blood plasmas.

The equivalent nitrogen content (in gram) of urea (in mmol) can be estimated by the conversion factor 0.028 g/mmol.[9] Furthermore, 1 gram of nitrogen is roughly equivalent to 6.25 grams of protein, and 1 gram of protein is roughly equivalent to 5 grams of muscle tissue. In situations such as muscle wasting, 1 mmol of excessive urea in the urine (as measured by urine volume in litres multiplied by urea concentration in mmol/l) roughly corresponds to a muscle loss of 0.67 gram.

In other species

In aquatic organisms the most common form of nitrogen waste is ammonia, whereas land-dwelling organisms convert the toxic ammonia to either urea or uric acid. Urea is found in the urine of mammals and amphibians, as well as some fish. Birds and saurian reptiles have a different form of nitrogen metabolism, that requires lesswater and leads to nitrogen excretion in the form of uric acid. It is noteworthy that tadpoles excrete ammonia but shift to urea production during metamorphosis. Despite the generalization above, the urea pathway has been documented not only in mammals and amphibians but in many other organisms as well, including birds,invertebrates, insects, plants, yeast, fungi, and even microorganisms.[citation needed]

Uses

Agriculture

More than 90% of world production of urea is destined for use as a nitrogen-release fertilizer. Urea has the highest nitrogen content of all solid nitrogenous fertilizers in common use. Therefore, it has the lowest transportation costs per unit of nitrogen nutrient. The standard crop-nutrient rating of urea is 46-0-0.[10]

Many soil bacteria possess the enzyme urease, which catalyzes the conversion of the urea molecule to two ammonia molecules and one carbon dioxide molecule, thus urea fertilizers are very rapidly transformed to the ammonium form in soils. Among soil bacteria known to carry urease, some ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB), such as species of Nitrosomonas, are also able to assimilate the carbon dioxide released by the reaction to make biomass via the Calvin Cycle, and harvest energy by oxidizing ammonia (the other product of urease) to nitrite, a process termed nitrification.[11] Nitrite-oxidizing bacteria, especially Nitrobacter, oxidize nitrite to nitrate, which is extremely mobile in soils and is a major cause of water pollution from agriculture. Ammonia and nitrate are readily absorbed by plants, and are the dominant sources of nitrogen for plant growth. Urea is also used in many multi-component solid fertilizer formulations. Urea is highly soluble in water and is, therefore, also very suitable for use in fertilizer solutions (in combination with ammonium nitrate: UAN), e.g., in ‘foliar feed’ fertilizers. For fertilizer use, granules are preferred over prills because of their narrower particle size distribution, which is an advantage for mechanical application.

The most common impurity of synthetic urea is biuret, which impairs plant growth.

Urea is usually spread at rates of between 40 and 300 kg/ha but rates vary. Smaller applications incur lower losses due to leaching. During summer, urea is often spread just before or during rain to minimize losses from volatilization (process wherein nitrogen is lost to the atmosphere as ammonia gas). Urea is not compatible with other fertilizers.

Because of the high nitrogen concentration in urea, it is very important to achieve an even spread. The application equipment must be correctly calibrated and properly used. Drilling must not occur on contact with or close to seed, due to the risk of germination damage. Urea dissolves in water for application as a spray or through irrigation systems.

In grain and cotton crops, urea is often applied at the time of the last cultivation before planting. In high rainfall areas and on sandy soils (where nitrogen can be lost through leaching) and where good in-season rainfall is expected, urea can be side- or top-dressed during the growing season. Top-dressing is also popular on pasture and forage crops. In cultivating sugarcane, urea is side-dressed after planting, and applied to each ratoon crop.

In irrigated crops, urea can be applied dry to the soil, or dissolved and applied through the irrigation water. Urea will dissolve in its own weight in water, but it becomes increasingly difficult to dissolve as the concentration increases. Dissolving urea in water is endothermic, causing the temperature of the solution to fall when urea dissolves.

As a practical guide, when preparing urea solutions for fertigation (injection into irrigation lines), dissolve no more than 30 kg urea per 100 L water.

In foliar sprays, urea concentrations of 0.5% – 2.0% are often used in horticultural crops. Low-biuret grades of urea are often indicated.

Urea absorbs moisture from the atmosphere and therefore is typically stored either in closed/sealed bags on pallets or, if stored in bulk, under cover with a tarpaulin. As with most solid fertilizers, storage in a cool, dry, well-ventilated area is recommended.

Chemical industry

Urea is a raw material for the manufacture of many important chemical compounds, such as

  • Various plastics, especially the urea-formaldehyde resins.
  • Various adhesives, such as urea-formaldehyde or the urea-melamine-formaldehyde used in marine plywood.
  • Potassium cyanate, another industrial feedstock.

Explosive

Urea can be used to make urea nitrate, a high explosive that is used industrially and as part of some improvised explosive devices.

Automobile systems

Urea is used in SNCR and SCR reactions to reduce the NOx pollutants in exhaust gases from combustion from diesel, dual fuel, and lean-burn natural gas engines. The BlueTec system, for example, injects water-based urea solution into the exhaust system. The ammonia produced by the hydrolysis of the urea reacts with the nitrogen oxide emissions and is converted into nitrogen and water within the catalytic converter.

Other commercial uses

  • A stabilizer in nitrocellulose explosives
  • A component of animal feed, providing a relatively cheap source of nitrogen to promote growth
  • A non-corroding alternative to rock salt for road de-icing, and the resurfacing of snowboarding halfpipes and terrain parks
  • A flavor-enhancing additive for cigarettes
  • A main ingredient in hair removers such as Nair and Veet
  • A browning agent in factory-produced pretzels
  • An ingredient in some skin cream,[12] moisturizers, hair conditioners
  • A reactant in some ready-to-use cold compresses for first-aid use, due to the endothermic reaction it creates when mixed with water
  • A cloud seeding agent, along with other salts
  • A flame-proofing agent, commonly used in dry chemical fire extinguisher charges such as the urea-potassium bicarbonate mixture
  • An ingredient in many tooth whitening products
  • An ingredient in dish soap
  • Along with ammonium phosphate, as a yeast nutrient, for fermentation of sugars into ethanol
  • A nutrient used by plankton in ocean nourishment experiments for geoengineering purposes
  • As an additive to extend the working temperature and open time of hide glue
  • As a solubility-enhancing and moisture-retaining additive to dye baths for textile dyeing or printing

Laboratory uses

Urea in concentrations up to 10 M is a powerful protein denaturant as it disrupts the noncovalent bonds in the proteins. This property can be exploited to increase the solubility of some proteins. A mixture of urea and choline chloride is used as a deep eutectic solvent, a type of ionic liquid.

Urea can in principle serve as a hydrogen source for subsequent power generation in fuel cells. Urea present in urine/wastewater can be used directly (though bacteria normally quickly degrade urea.) Producing hydrogen by electrolysis of urea solution occurs at a lower voltage (0.37V) and thus consumes less energy than the electrolysis of water (1.2V).[13]

Urea in concentrations up to 8 M can be used to make fixed brain tissue transparent to visible light while still preserving florescent signals from labeled cells. This allows for much deeper imaging of neuronal processes then previously obtainable using conventional one photon or two photon confocal microscopes.[14]

Medical use

Urea-containing creams are used as topical dermatological products to promote rehydration of the skin. Urea 40% is indicated for psoriasis, xerosis, onychomycosis, ichthyosis, eczema, keratosis,keratoderma, corns, and calluses. If covered by an occlusive dressing, 40% urea preparations may also be used for nonsurgical debridement of nails. Urea 40% “dissolves the intercellular matrix”[15] of the nail plate. Only diseased or dystrophic nails are removed, as there is no effect on healthy portions of the nail. This drug is also used as an earwax removal aid. Urea can also be used as a Diuretic.

Certain types of instant cold packs (or ice packs) contain water and separated urea crystals. Rupturing the internal water bag starts an endothermic reaction and allows the pack to be used to reduce swelling.

Like saline, urea injection is used to perform abortions.

Urea is the main component of an alternative medicinal treatment referred to as urine therapy.

The blood urea nitrogen (BUN) test is a measure of the amount of nitrogen in the blood that comes from urea. It is used as a marker of renal function.

Urea labeled with carbon-14 or carbon-13 is used in the urea breath test, which is used to detect the presence of the bacteria Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) in the stomach and duodenum of humans, associated with peptic ulcers. The test detects the characteristic enzyme urease, produced by H. pylori, by a reaction that produces ammonia from urea. This increases the pH (reduces acidity) of the stomach environment around the bacteria. Similar bacteria species to H. pylori can be identified by the same test in animals such as apes, dogs, and cats (including big cats).

Chemical properties

Molecular and crystal structure

The urea molecule is planar in the crystal structure, but the geometry around the nitrogens is pyramidal in the gas-phase minimum-energy structure.[20] In solid urea, the oxygen center is engaged in two N-H-O hydrogen bonds. The resulting dense and energetically favourable hydrogen-bond network is probably established at the cost of efficient molecular packing: The structure is quite open, the ribbons forming tunnels with square cross-section. The carbon in urea is described as sp2 hybridized, the C-N bonds have significant double bond character, and the carbonyl oxygen is basic compared to, say, formaldehyde. Urea’s high aqueous solubility reflects its ability to engage in extensive hydrogen bonding with water.

By virtue of its tendency to form a porous frameworks, urea has the ability to trap many organic compounds. In these so-called clathrates, the organic “guest” molecules are held in channels formed by interpenetrating helices composed of hydrogen-bonded urea molecules. This behaviour can be used to separate mixtures, e.g. in the production of aviation fuel and lubricating oils, and in the separation ofparaffins.

As the helices are interconnected, all helices in a crystal must have the same molecular handedness. This is determined when the crystal is nucleated and can thus be forced by seeding. The resulting crystals have been used to separate racemic mixtures.

Reactions

Urea reacts with alcohols to form urethanes. Urea reacts with malonic esters to make barbituric acids.

Safety

Urea can be irritating to skin, eyes, and the respiratory tract. Repeated or prolonged contact with urea in fertilizer form on the skin may cause dermatitis.

High concentrations in the blood can be damaging. Ingestion of low concentrations of urea, such as are found in typical human urine, are not dangerous with additional water ingestion within a reasonable time-frame. Many animals (e.g., dogs) have a much more concentrated urine and it contains a higher urea amount than normal human urine; this can prove dangerous as a source of liquids for consumption in a life-threatening situation (such as in a desert).

Urea can cause algal blooms to produce toxins, and its presence in the runoff from fertilized land may play a role in the increase of toxic blooms.[21]

The substance decomposes on heating above melting point, producing toxic gases, and reacts violently with strong oxidants, nitrites, inorganic chlorides, chlorites and perchlorates, causing fire and explosion.[citation needed]


From the Wikipedia article on Urine Therapy

In alternative medicine, the term urine therapy or urotherapy, (also urinotherapy or uropathy) refers to various applications of human urine for medicinal or cosmetic purposes, including drinking of one’s own urine and massaging one’s skin with one’s own urine. While there is currently insufficient evidence for the therapeutic use of urine, many chemical components of urine have wide-scale use, such as urea and urokinase.[1][2][3][4][5]

Many of the earliest human cultures used urine as a medicine.History

Hinduism

A Sanskrit text called the Damar Tantra, not part of core Hinduism, contains 107 stanzas on the benefits of “pure water, or one’s own urine”.[10] In this text, urine therapy is referred to as Shivambu Kalpa.[10]This text suggests, among other uses and prescriptions, massaging one’s skin with fresh, concentrated urine. In the Ayurvedic tradition, which is related to the Hindu scriptures called the Vedas. urine therapy is called amaroli which when practised requires some dietary requirements such as mixing it with water to “cure cancers” and other “diseases” along with “raw food and certain fruits like banana, papaya and citrus fruits” which are claimed to be “very good in the practice of amaroli”.[11][12][13][14] One of the main aims of this system is to “prevent illness, heal the sick and preserve life”.[13][15]

Other cultures

The French customarily soaked stockings in urine and wrapped them around their necks in order to cure strep throat.[2] Aristocratic French women in the 17th century reportedly bathed in urine to beautify their skin.

In Sierra Madre, Mexico, farmers prepare poultices for broken bones by having a child urinate into a bowl of powdered charred corn. The mixture is made into a paste and applied to the skin.[17]

As in ancient Rome, urine was used for teeth-whitening during the Renaissance, though they did not necessarily consume their own urine.

The homeopath John Henry Clarke wrote, “…man who, for a skin affection, drank in the morning the urine he had passed the night before. The symptoms were severe, consisting of general-dropsy, scanty urine, and excessive weakness. These symptoms I have arranged under Urinum. Urinotherapy is practically as old as man himself. The Chinese (Therapist, x. 329) treat wounds by sprinkling urine on them, and the custom is widespread in the Far East. Taken internally, it is believed to stimulate the circulation”.[18]

Modern claims and findings

Urine’s main constituents are water and urea; the latter of which has some well-known commercial and other uses. Urine also contains small quantities of thousands of compounds, hormones and metabolites,[5][19] including corticosteroids.[20] Pregnant mare’s urine has high amounts of estrogens, which are isolated and sold as Premarin. There is no scientific evidence of a therapeutic use for untreated urine.[1][2][3][4][5]

It has been claimed that urine is similar to other body fluids, like amniotic fluid or even blood, but these claims have no scientific basis.[4]

Urinating on jellyfish stings is a common folk remedy, but has no beneficial effect and may be counterproductive, as it can activate nematocysts remaining at the site of the sting.

People who use Amanita muscaria as an intoxicating drug will sometimes drink their own urine in order to prolong its effects, especially when there are shortages of the fungus.[21][22]

Use as anti-cancer agent

Urine and urea have been claimed by some practitioners to have an anti-cancer effect. It has been hypothesized that because some cancer cell antigens are transferred through urine, through “oral autourotherapy” these antigens could be introduced to the immune system that might then create antibodies.[23]

Auto-urine drinking and meditation

Drinking one’s morning urine (‘amaroli’) was an ancient yoga practise designed to promote meditation. The ancient Hindu and yoga texts that mention auto-urine drinking, require it be done before sunrise and that only the mid-stream sample be used.[33] The pineal hormone melatonin and its conjugated esters are present in morning urine in significant quantities, the pineal gland secreting melatonin maximally at about 2 am, this secretion being shut off by the eyes’ exposure to bright sunlight.[33] Melatonin, when ingested or given intravenously, amongst other effects, provokes tranquility and heightened visualisation.[33] There are high concentrations of melatonin in the first morning urine, but not in a physiologically active form.[33] Mills and Faunce at Newcastle University Australia in 1991 developed the hypothesis that ingestion of morning urine into low pH gastric acid would cause deconjugation of its esters back to the active form of melatonin. This, they suggested, might restore plasma night-time melatonin levels. Thus, they argued, oral pre-dawn consumption of auto-exogenous melatonin, by either re-setting of the sleep-wake cycle or enhancement of the physiological prerequisites for meditation (decreased body awareness (i.e. analgesia) and claimed slowed brain wave activity, as well as heightened visualization ability), may be the mechanism behind the alleged benefits ascribed to ‘amaroli’ or auto-urine drinking by ancient texts of the yogic religion.[33] Obvious experimental difficulties (particularly in constructing a double-blind clinical trial) mean that this is a difficult hypothesis to reliably test to any requisite evidence-based standard.


 

3 thoughts on “Can You Increase Height And Grow Taller Using Ayurvedic Urea?

  1. Dr. Robert Vaughn

    Beware: Ayurvedic Urea is so freaking expensive and so rare only millionaires can buy it, the price at the official website starts at $55000… but i have the original stock and sell cheap.
    I got just a few packages left. contact us now…. zamachemicalhouse@hotmail.fr

    Reply
  2. Pingback: Proof That Lance Ward, The Grow Taller Guru Is The Scammer Behind The Ayurvedic Urea Grow Taller Product

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