Finger clamping update

So I’ve been hand clamping the proximal part of my finger and it looks like there may be some significant results.  I’d have to validate with x-rays.  Here’s the last finger clamping results.

So now I’m going to try a few things.  i’m going to clamp the proximal part of my finger once more.  And I’m going to start clamping my thumbs.  The left thumbs is a little bit longer than the right due to previous LSJL experimentation so I’m going to start clamping my right to see if I can get my right thumb equal and perhaps surpass my right.

I’ve also been hand clamping on my wrists, elbows, knees, and ankles.  There may be possible results or it could be mind trickery.  I’ll keep trying.  Hand clamping does seem to be working better than quick grip clamping possibly due to the fact it is more precise and you can feel the deformation of bone.

Below is comparison images of my right(hand clamped) versus left index finger.  They are aligned based on the middle lines of the finger due to the fact that it is much harder to align on the base of the finger.  Also is the before image of the thumbs.  I’ll start by clamping the medial joint of the right thumb.

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12 thoughts on “Finger clamping update

  1. Bran

    Hey Tyler you said that Epiphyseal Cartilage can be implanted in previous article but if that happens how can one still grow if there ultimate height is determined by genetics. I know you said hgh products can help with the growth but the real question is how can you grow more if genetics determines your ultimate height.

    Reply
  2. HeightSeeker

    What does the finger clamping really prove here? How does this correlate with height growth? I’m curious as to why insight into this has been focused on for the past two months.

    Reply
    1. Tyler Post author

      Bones are involved in lengthening the fingers as they are in the legs and arms. If I can prove that the fingers can lengthen that can help get more resources to apply to fingers and arms. I’ve been doing hand clamping on my elbows/wrists/knees/ankles and despite feeling like I’m not clamping hard enough I may be getting some results but I want to be sure.

      Reply
  3. Anonymous

    Have you heard of thru-hiking? There’s a lot of anecdotal reports of long distance hikers permanently going up a shoe size, sometimes two – even in very late adulthood. It seems to only happen with hardcore long distance hikers. Might be something to look into.

    Reply
      1. Anonymous

        Sure thing!

        Here’s a couple threads discussing it:

        http://www.whiteblaze.net/forum/showthread.php/105019-Experiences-with-feet-growing-on-a-thru-hike

        http://www.whiteblaze.net/forum/archive/index.php/t-74958.html?s=221e9e116f3d0dee999ebdc705275274

        It doesn’t seem to be uncommon, but apparently it’s permanent so not just a temporary thing from all the swelling. I would think that all the continued force of different terrains with extreme swelling probably has something to do with it. Thru-hiking involves hundreds trails sometimes thousands of miles so it’s could cause a lot more swelling than a nurse on her feet all day. I remember some old 19th century studies about how hyperemia would be induced to help kids with limb length discrepancies get their healthy leg to catch up to the one that had been growing faster from tuberculosis. Here’s a 1967 article mentioning that and some other interesting stuff:

        http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/pdf/10.3109/17453676708989616

        Hope this was helpful.

        Reply
  4. james

    hey tyler just wanna know how much pressure you are applying on the legs when hand clamping since im also trying this out myself and wanna make sure im doing it right

    Reply
    1. Tyler Post author

      I’m doing it as hard as possible. Be sure to do ankle and wrist clamping as well as it’s easier to exert force there. You can actually feel bone deformation. I’m not sure there’s a right method yet.

      Reply
    1. Tyler Post author

      It could be a result of hiking inducing the swelling in the feet generating hydrostatic pressure which in turn induces longidudinal bone growth. Swelling of the feet does seem to be the commonality. So one thing to do would be to study feet swelling and then study long distance walking effects on the feet. Hiking takes you through a number of terain: uphill, downhill, so it’d be hard to find a specific factor.

      Reply
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